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Geronimo and Native American History PDF Print E-mail

Geronimo Geronimo was the leader of the last American Indian fighting force formally to surrender to the United States. Because he fought against such daunting odds and held out the longest, Geronimo became the most famous Apache of all. To the pioneers and settlers of Arizona and New Mexico, he was a bloody-handed murderer and this image endured until the second half of this century.

Follow the Geronimo trail and learn more about the history of Geronimo and the Apache Indians. 

 
John Slaughter & San Bernardino Ranch PDF Print E-mail

Slaughter RanchIn 1887, John Slaughter purchased the ranch that is now known as the San Bernardino Wildlife Refuge. He re-established cattle ranching and farming and they continued until 1979. The ranch is now registered as a National Historic Landmark and provides a glimpse of turn-of-the-century life in the lush ranchland of Southern Arizona.

Slaughter Ranch  

 
San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge PDF Print E-mail

Gila Woodpecker Located 17 miles east of Douglas in a wide valley, the 2,309 acre ranch is now a wildlife refuge which includes a portion of the Yaqui River, which drains into northern Mexico. During the 1700’s, the Jesuit missionaries occupied the area. A land grant established in 1822 resulted in extensive cattle grazing activity for more than 10 years, until ranchers were driven out by the Apache Indians. Cavalry regiments left their mark during the early 1900’s, while protecting settlers against raids by Pancho Villa and his men. Today, the refuge is open to birdwatching, photography and hiking, as well as dove, quail and cottontail rabbit hunting in season.  More than 283 species are represented in the aquatic and riparian habitats of the San Bernardino Wildlife Refuge. 

San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge 

 
Aviation History PDF Print E-mail
 Douglas boasts the first international airport in the U.S. During WWII, pilots were trained at the Bisbee/Douglas Airfield for future combat missions. Amelia Earhardt was one of many famous aviators to fly to Douglas during a cross-country trip. The city’s air museum houses a collection of aeronautical photos, a custom airplane and other aviation memorabilia.
 
The Grand Theatre PDF Print E-mail
 This majestic Beaux Arts-style theater was once considered the grand dame in the Southwest and played host to vaudeville acts and performances by the likes of Ginger Rogers, Al Jolson and the some of the period’s finest musicians and entertainers. Closed to the public in the late 1950s, the theatre has suffered significant damage, including a collapsed roof. Now, a painstaking renovation is in progress, with the goal of restoring the city’s gem to its former glory. Stand in front and imagine the glory days of vaudeville and film in this small town, which was once home to 13 movie theatres. Check out the photo gallery section for a few historic glimpses of the Grand Theatre.
 
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Did You Know?
Dust was an early environmental issue for the city's first residents. Most residents furnished their porches with feather dusters and proper Douglas etiquette was a complete brushing of one's person before entering a home.
Historic Douglas

 Historic Douglas Take a tour through Douglas’ fascinating past from its early mining history to the later Maquiladores years. These are the places and faces that have made Douglas Arizona’s home town.

   Visit Historic Douglas

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